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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
politically charged controversy is over u.n. ambassador susan rice's comments five days after the attack. why she blamed it on benghazi demonstrations, officials now say didn't even happen. and why she didn't mention terrorist forces? intelligence officials now believe actually targeted the u.s. consulate there. democrats emerge saying the answer was simple, she was using these unclassified cia talking points which omitted mention of extremist elements because it was still classified and could have compromised intelligence sources. >> she used the unclassified talking points that were signed off on by the entire intelligence community, so criticisms of her are completely unwarranted. >> reporter: democrats accuse republicans of unnecessarily assassinating rice's character. >> to select ambassador rice because she used an unclassified talking point, to say that she is unqualified to be secretary of state i think is a mistake. >> reporter: but republicans say the problem is rice freelanced. >> she went beyond that. and she even mentioned that under the leadership of barack obama we have decimat
the diplomacy route, we're also expecting u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon. also the president of the palestinian authority, mahmoud abb abbas. we do not know if he'll be meeting with any hamas officials. he most certainly is not expected to be making a trip to gaza. another explosion again in the distance. we're hearing sirens from the streets below.happening, we are expecting a trip from the 16 foreign ministers, the members of the arab league as well as the turkish foreign minister. certainly a lot of movement on the diplomatic front, but we're stillen continuing to hear e explosi explosions. >> i'm sure people very accustomed to noises like that. arwa damon, thank you. >>> israeli president shimon peres says he is concerned about stopping the iranians from sending long-range missiles to hamas. peres telling piers morgan he sees two distinct story lines developing in this gaza conflict. one positive, one negative. >> the positive is the constructive wall that the egyptian president is playing right now, and we appreciate very much his efforts. the other is the iranians. they
diane feinstein defendeded u.n. ambassador susan rice. >> he made it clear that there was significant terrorist involvement. that is not my recollection of what he told us september 14th. >> to say that she is unqualified to be secretary of state i think is a mistake. and the way it keeps going, it's almost as if the intent is to assess nate -- >> joining me now is karen finny a political analyst and armstrong williams a conservative columnist and host of the right side with armstrong williams. hello to you both. good to see you. >> hi, alex. >> ladies first with you, karen. you just heard from congressman king. one of his biggest complaints was the white house held back information that this was a terrorist attack claiming this was classified. this is different from the white house's initial defense that they did call it a terrorist attack right away. are they changing their tune? >> well, what i find interesting is the way congressman king and a number of the other republicans have changed their tune from the night before the briefing and oh, what a difference it makes when you actu
: the president is being warned against promoting u.n. ambassador susan rice. under fire about her incorrect statements about what happened in benghazi, but democrats say the attacks on rice are about race and gender. we will talk to kelly ayotte and see what she thinks about that. bill: feeling the heat from a major -- >> we don't have the estimate on the grid impact, we are still working on that. if you look through the downtown area the majority of it is dark except for the people who do have generators. there is a fairly substantial impact. copd makes it hard to breathe, but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteopo
. >> primarily subsaharan africa and around the world. >> around the world. the goal for hiv, there is a u.n. report that came out that is really saying hiv is -- it's not, you know, overcoming hiv is not just a dream. it's really going to become a reality if we continue on the investments and efforts we've been making. >> well, at this point, how many health care professionals do you think you can afford to send into the field? >> so we've actually committed to sending 30 to 36 doctors and nurses abroad. so about 12 into each country. we're starting three countries. malawi, tanzania and uganda. it's not a question of how many we can afford, how many should we send in the first year and really do we think to begin to make sort of -- really see on the ground taking care of patients and making a real difference to the places they're working and we as the non-profit of global service corps have committed to raising the funds to be able to do that. we need people's help. we'll encourage people to go to our website and to make a contribution and to be a part of this mission with us. this is -- it
for the past four u.n. ambassadors to the u.n. mohammed morsi was something of a hero to the united states when he helped broker that cease-fire between israel and hamas in gaza. now what is going on. >> my, what six weeks will do. six weeks ago we had president obama saying that egypt and morsi wasn't really an enemy and they weren't really our friend. wasn't an ally. six weeks later we see secretary of state hillary clinton gushing over the fact that egypt was able to broker this cease-fire. clearly, jon, the cease-fire is great news, and i think that the egyptian president does deserve credit for brokering this. he went in to gaza, he tried to do what he could. i think most observers were a little bit uncomfortable with wh he was saying inside gaza and i think he came down on hamas' side a little bit too much. he is a leader of the muslim brotherhood. we were a little bit concerned with his actions. but then when the cease-fire happened secretary of state hillary clinton stood next to him and really just gushed over the fact that he was able to produce this cease-fire. then you saw -- jon: d
terms, then yes, somebody will welcome u.n. and welcome your big ships in, then maybe you might be able just to pull it off and still have something in the indian ocean and the eastern mediterranean. and by the way, it isn't just the defense ships but if there's any kind of problems you have to send other ships there. so the numbers don't add up that way. in terms of michele's direct question, you know, how do we deal with this, after all, this is a much larger problem. don't forget, the national debt right now is $10 trillion, give or take. if the sequestered it, that's 54.6, correct me, you're the one who knows it to the nearest 10th of a bill i think it is 54.6 billion for each of nine years. 54.6 billion off of 10 trillion? think about that. how big he didn't are you making in the national debt? now why am i looking at the debt? because the budget is a fraction of the problem. the problem is entitlement. it is not defense. defense is practically a rounding error. so if you want to go ahead and trade defense as a hostage to the issues that have to be dealt with, go right ahead. but t
when he gave his speech at the u.n. and he had this graphic illustration of the problem, he created what was a new threshold for them. for the previous, i don't know, six to 12 months, israelis have been focusing on what they called immunity. the result of immunity. what you mean by that was the death and the breath and the hardening of the nuclear program they face an existential threat and have the military option to deal with it. so they are saying under a point at which they own immunity is going to kick in, he was saying this is going to be the end of 2012. he has changed that and has said it has been pushed back eight to 10 months. when the prime minister was in new york, he focused not only on his own immunity, but the point at which iranians would cross the threshold where they would have the ability to build a nuclear weapon and you wouldn't be able to do anything about it. and he was suggesting that that would be when they had one at 20%. that is a limited definition. the issue for him was to define in a way, it also pushed off into the middle of 2013. they came up with di
diplomats are coming to israel and to 9 region, not just the u.n. secretary-general, but the u.s. secretary of state as you've just said has been dispatched by president obama to meet face-to-face with the principles in this conflict. the prime minister of israel, the president of egypt who is taking the lead in organizing these cease-fire negotiations from the hamas side with israel. soledad? >> christiane, that sounds like the short-term option, right? you sort of try to hold everything down while you negotiate some kind of a short-term peace. what are people saying about the longer-term options here? >> well, you know, there's a lot of devil in the details, as always. you know, each side wants to make sure it's not just a short-term. it's a long-term option. because on the one hand, israel wants a long-term solution to the rockets that are being fired into israel, and into threatening the residents of that area of southern israel close to gaza. on the other hand, the hamas and the palestinians in gaza want a long-term solution to lifting the siege of gaza, and also want a promise, a pled
is in carnegie, pennsylvania. hi, patrick. caller: happy thanksgiving. i am profoundly un-optimistic about the state of our economy and their future. when i read about the entire presbyterian church, the methodist church, the evangelical lutheran church wanting to end all relationships with the state of israel, i think our country -- we are literally being occupied by a foreign government by the state of israel. i have to tell you, when you look at the economic apartheid on wall street where the american people are treading on one platform while the zionist regime in control of our country is trading, we are becoming a nation that is completely and utterly occupied. host: that was patrick from pennsylvania. hi, judy. caller: hi. i just want to say that my husband dave and i are very optimistic about the future. we are happy that the president won. our concern -- your last caller was talking about religion and the churches. we don't see why they should be playing a part in our government and big we are concerned about the separation of church and state. we are also concerned about the racia
the arab world against israel. >> let me tell you something about the arab world, gregg. i served at the u.n. for six years and i was there during the second world war, and i cannot even start telling you the number of prime ministers, kings and sultans from the arab world and said, go, finish the job, don't stop. there is no sympathy in the arab world for hamas. hamas is supported by iran. the only ones that want to see them survive and prevail is the iranians. they would celebrate if hamas was gone. gregg: i spent a lot of time in the west bank and down in gas aeu met with terrorist, i met with families of homicide bombers. one distinct impression i walked away with, for every terrorist there are ten willing to fill his or her shoes. again i ask the question, can hamas really be stamped out. >> you've been to the west bank and gaza and you see the difference. the west bank is thriving, the cities have great economies, great safety and security. and i believe at the end of the day that most palestinians want to live like that. they don't want to live in this world's largest prison hamas has
on the one hand to not take their decision to push for statehood to the u.n. on november 28, that is why secretary of state clinton met with barack obama earlier today, if you think you can get them to control the thoughts and so there is no more rocket fire out, then we won't send him those roundtrips. but this is a very tenuous agreement at best at the way the different parties and what they have agreed to. megyn: you make it sound like an egg shell -- an egg shell peas. even those who call themselves jihadist can crack themselves by one gunshot and the deal is off. benjamin netanyahu is going to speak momentarily, so we will find out when the english translation will come. earlier you reported that it was unusual for israel to agree to a peace deal like this on a day in which a bus attack happened in tel aviv. when you say that? >> well, i think it's very unusual. that is a position of weakness. if you have a situation where a bomb has gone off on a bus in tel aviv, the first time there's been a terror attack since 2006 in tel aviv, the first bus bombings since 2004 in tel aviv, that
, the role of the security council, and our role in the security council in the u.n. system. almost everything that's important is at stake with this. this is the most critical and most dangerous situation that the administration will be facing in the next year. looking at it, though, and while this year is critical, as den sis said, we have to realize this is not all about some misunderstanding or some fixable problem with iran not getting it about itself civil nuclear program or colliding with the international community. these are all manifestations of the long term confrontation that we, and the rest of the west and the region had with iran as least since the 1970s. this will go on, regardless of whether we get a nuclear deal or we have a strike to prevent iran from moving to the nuclear weapons capability. we're going to have to deal with this problem over the long term just as we have over the last 30 years because it flows from iran's view of its role in the region and inconsistency of that view with the view of the other countries in the region, our values, and our role, bot
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)